Going Home: A Letter to the Reader

Going Home: A Letter to the Reader

Dear Reader,

The problem one finds in writing about Rome is articulating the abundance of material. It is a city that is, at once, overflowing with history and brimming with modern life. People pass through downtown on their way to work, striding along the fabled Roman Forum and Colosseum. One can imagine the insignificance of the self in a city that has stood, in some form, for over 2500 years. The monstrous amount of history, both pagan and Christian, is staggering. To stand in the shadow of something as monumental as the St. Peter's Basilica can leave one in tears, immediately breaking any notion of pride or hubris. 

Yet, the real fun of Rome is the journey through the city. To see the Forum, countless museums, Vatican City, St. John Lateran, Old Masters, travel the country, or simply be in another place is difficult to describe. One must fight to not feel humbled by Rome. Blisters, buckled knees, and sore backs served as a penance for every Mass and visited basilica. Most evenings were spent in good company with simple wines and wonderful talks. It was the most comfortable and at home that I have ever felt. 

For these reasons, I, as well as the editorial staff at The Classical Contrarians, will be returning to Italy for the month of May. We will still post as regularly as possible, (time and internet connection willing) but the tone of the articles will be more personal and focused on our return to the Eternal City. Our sincere hope is that we encourage you, the reader, to seek those things which are permanent and lasting. If you are of the praying type, I ask that you keep our group in your thoughts.


“Men did not love Rome because she was great. She was great because they had loved her.” - G.K. Chesterton

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